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of laws, to signal the distinction between church and state u >> four have not quincy adams on a book of laws? >> franklin pierce also on a book of law. partly we think because he lost his last child only a couple of months before the inauguration. his wife was in bereavement and he affirmed the oath rather than swore to it which the constitution -- the next was theodore roosevelt. a long time and that's because he took office after the death of the president and he was in a hotel in buffalo and apparently, they didn't have gideons' bibles around. he was the next one. and so, you look at those, three the last is lbj, who, of course, after another assassination, they had a catholic missile that he took the oath on. scattered throughout american history. >> have presidents invoked religion in their addresses, always? >> every president has invoked god or a deity in general, but not very specifically. none has actually mentioned jesus christ, four have invoked christianity. also uneven. >> has religion become more or less important over time in inaugural addresses? >> looking into the su
-frank bill, the president signed into law. >> there will be no more tax-funded bailouts. period. >> years of spending added up and the debt ceiling talks of 2011 led to a budget standoff between democrats and republicans who had taken back control of the house in the mid-terms. >> is there a risk that the united states could lose its triple-a credit rating, yes or no? >> no risk of that. >> no risk. >> the debt ceiling was raised in august, the political fight and the spotlight on the count row's deficit and debt problems led s&p to downgrade the u.s. credit rating for the first time in history. >> geithner steered the major economic moves in the first term, now he's stepping down at treasury. the pick to replace him is jack lew, who has established a close relationship with the president. he is know chummy with the republicans on the hill after the debt ceiling negotiation. for that reason and other, his looming confirmation hearing could be bumpy. but if confirmed, lew will likely be dealing with the top issue in this second term, how to get the economy moving and addressing the count r
made worse. >> medicare is in federal law to pay $100 million in medical services for prison inmates and illegal immigrants. they recommend a better system to automatically flag such charges and stop illegal payments before they are made. the dow is up again, gaining 46. the s&p is on a seven-day win streak but barely. the nasdaq lost 23. so how much money would it take to solve world poverty? one media outlet did not do the math. another whopping example of media double standards. grapevine is next. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it
in the last four years. and his mother in law. this is the first president in more than a generation who has his mother-in-law living at the white house. good or bad, he has his mother-in-law living at the white house. that should be, at some levels, admired. it is what it is. she is very instrumental in raising the girls and keeping them grounded. the major folks are in place. the remaining members of the president's family, including his daughter and mother in law will establish their seats. these girls will be 15 and 18 years old for years from now. they will have spent a majority of their formative years in the white house. they have grown to be remarkable young ladies and under the duress and the pressure in the public eye, they have certainly been a credit to this president. peter barnes, i am wondering, as these kids taken their dad and the overtures that he will make to lead this nation and united, it is a very different tone now than it was four years ago. peter: that is right neil. right now, in the latest fox news poll he is up 48%. when he was first elected, he was about 65%. the
-doping agency that he was contrite, that he was serious about taking their findings as the new law of the land. that their findings about him were correct. he had to show he was serious about that, and if he did that, maybe they would lift the lifetime ban they had imposed upon him. the second thing he had to do was build public sympathy. try to remind people why they fell in love with lance armstrong in the first place. on the first front failed miserably. he actually drew a line through the heart of the report. the heart of the report said that lance armstrong was actually a doping ringleader, that he wasn't just another cyclist who used peds, but that he organized his team to actually use dope. >> he wasn't seping of that last night. >> no. he said absolutely not. and today they are not happy with that interview. on the second front about building public sympathy, i mean, my word, i felt like i was watching the titanic hit an iceberg. i felt like oprah kept trying to help him, like throwing him lifelines, like try to make yourself more sympathetic, please. all he could do is stare back with
president obama, a constitutional law professor and chief justice of the supreme court john roberts should have known like the back of their hands. but the mistake made for an awkward moment in the middle of a solemn occasion. the swearing in of the first african-american president in front of a crowd more than a million strong on the national mall. robe robert's flub was significant enough that the oath had to be taken again. the very next day at the white house. >> i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. >> reporter: cnn senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin wrote an entire book about this awkward moment in presidential history titled "the oath." did they need to do it, again? >> no one knows. >> really? >> to this day because the legal significance of the oath remains kind of a mystery. so, they just said, look, someone could file a lawsuit, someone could make trouble. we don't want to spend the first week, the first month of the obama presidency litigating whether he is president. so, let's just do it. it's slightly embarrass, it's slightly weird. we'll do
years, it's time to write about hit in the books of law. the job of the president-- and obama has done this magnificently-- to make america feel its greatness, its ideals to arouse our idealism. it's also the job of a president to write it in the books of law, to get actual legislation passed. that's what a nation is governed by and the second term in my mind is going to hinge on what is written in the books of law. >> rose: two things, one is that there's no question that l.b.j. is the most formidable political human figure i've ever met and if we had only known that person that bob caro knows through his research that i was lucky enough to know when i was 24 years old i think the country would have been felt differently there was one moment that he spoke to a bunch of reporters and he was himself and he never did that again. the teleprompter was a girdle on him. to go back to what bob woodward said, we can't forget that the republicans have attacked the democrats and obama even more fiercely than he's attacked them so it's not like he's out there saying these mean things about them.
principalled way to make children safe is to make lawful citizens less safe and violent criminals more safe : >> the nra calls it a strong opposition to any new gun regulation. >>> and they will head up a hearing on gun opposition. mike thompson is a gun owner and he said there is room for changes to reduce gun violence and that includes background checks for gun purchases and he will provide stricter penalties as well as all gun trafficking. >>> prime minister benjamin netanyahu thought it was a land slight and he will serve a third term with newly seats lost in parliament. they are suggesting the right wink may be -- wing may be stalled. he wants it as broad as possible and plans to honor that. >>> they are moving forward with a controversial plan to reduce the areas' growing deer population. they say deer no longer fear humans and they are acting aggressively towards pets. starting this weekend, they will start sterilizing female deer and they will be relocating the deer but it is a temporary fix. >> once 30 deer will come, they will have to repeat every two to four years. they have give
of presidential history. doug, the swearing-in today is required by law. under the 20th amendment it has to be by noon on the 20th of january. but the parties and the public celebration are going to be tomorrow. how many times has that happened? >> well, it doesn't happen too often. bup it's become part of our tradition now that you do a swearing-in. ronald reagan in 1985, for example, had to do just this, was sworn in but sundays are football days. and the reagan ended up actually tossing the coin for the super bowl later that afternoon. so today you have football going on. i'm sure the president has the opportunity now to go home watch the game and relax. it doesn't have to move in. he's already in washington. his work begins. but i found this simplicity very moving because often in american history we have swearings-in that are tragedies. i mean you have john f. kennedy being killed in dallas and lyndon johnson quickly being sworn in. or when warren harding tied and coolidge sworn in. there are many examples of that. the simplicity of this, the fact that the weather is good. this is i
by close family members and friends, the first lady, the first daughters, his sister, his mother-in-law and brother-in-law during that ceremony that lasted just about 30 seconds. and the big public ceremony will take place tomorrow at the capitol and this was a chance for the president in a private ceremony at the swearing in here in the blue room. you saw and heard the president a few seconds ago, take a listen at the very end, after the president started greeting the first lady and the first daughters. >> thank you. dy it. i did it. >> so, leave it to the first daughters. the daughter sasha telling the president he didn't mess up. that's a reference to four years ago. when during that public ceremony they kind of stepped on some of the words, had to do a redo, that didn't happen this time around, soledad and john. >> what's the current status of this speech here. less than 24 hours ago to go until show-time? >> we're told the president is in the final moments of the wrapping the speech. he will be tweaking it until the time of delivery. this is something the president has been working
because you're in selling what my wife and i and brother and sister-in-law and my sister and brother-in-law are trying to do with our kids, instilling that had a service, making it second nature to but others first as chelsea's parents taught her. so my request to you today is to take advantage of the hundred plus organizations in this tent and on the small around this city that are out there to see if there is one where their mission matches your passion and consider serving our veterans as a small way of repaying the service that they have given to us. as my father said, helpless show -- help us show that the strength of our example as an example of our strength. plug in to do all they can to strengthen our nation. [cheers and applause] today, we can all and hand and do the same. and in doing so, we are working to make our great country worthy of our veterans service and their sacrifice. thank you and god bless our troops. [cheers and applause] your name?'s >> the president and first lady or at an elementary school in washington, d.c. where they participated in a community service project
it and one is a law office building so they could have put it there overnight some people are saying that is unlikely or maybe it was papasser by. tara moriarty ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> just hours ago they approved a measure to hire somebody as a consultant for the police department. here is more on the reaction to the vote. >> reporter: after a lengthy comment period that went into the morning hours, they approved the hiring of a man who as a former chief his policing policies came under fire and the vote early this morning sparked outrage. >> 7 yeses... >> boo, boo, boo... >> reporter: ktvu channel 2 morning news had the only cameras inside and they approved the deal on a 7-1 vote. roughly 275 people spoke at this lengthy council meeting an many opposed them to come in and develop a crime fighting plan for oakland. critics say the man who headed up the police department in new york and l.a., could cause racial profiling. the only member to approve it said police cannot truly address the root causes of crime. >> i am very against this contract tonight. it is not about not be
>>> good morning. four more years. >> health care reform is no longer -- it is the law of the land. >>> united states conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >>> the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. >>> we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >>> president barack obama, the 44th president, takes the oath of office to serve a second term. and we're here for all the tradition, pageantry and tradition "today," monday, january 21st, 2013. >> announcer: from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," the second inauguration of barack obama, with matt lauer and savannah guthrie live from washington, d.c. >>> and good monday morning to you, everyone. welcome to a special edition of "today" on a monday morning from capitol hill. as you look at the white house there, now the capitol. i'm matt lauer alongside savannah guthrie, natalie morales and mr. al roker. >> beautiful sunrise in washington. no matter who you voted for, this is an historic day for th
the first mother-in-law walk through the marion robertson, ma leaand sasha obama. ma leais 14 and sasha is 11. they are dressed head to toe in jay crew. >> thank you for the fashion. >> i will be keeping up with the fashion all day. >> what do you look to in the past when you look at a second inaugural? >> i think it's another affirmation of the american system, have people out on the mall, see the president and the transfer of power and that's the glory of american system and that's what george washington brought, the first person to give up power, no one thought he was going to do it. even though it's a ceremony but it's a ceremony that is -- it bring's lot to our country and to our nation. >> is it one of those ceremonies, do you agree with beverly and richard that the second time in many respects, speaks more to what people's expectations are of their president than the first time. >> there's been an affirmation of what braun did by a majority of american people. and it turns out, a bigger majority than people thought. many people thought he wasn't going to win at all so this is, i
of our laws date back to the 1950's. some to the 1960's. there has to be a way of bringing it up to date. those are things that will have to be negotiated. all be just say it can't managed by a central system in washington where washington decides how many nurses we need, how many farm workers. business will have to play a role and business will have to be the determining factor in order to make this work in a practical way. >> think for a man and that 10,000 people a day retire in the united states, seven days a week. we are a nation with unemployment and with a shortage of people that go to work at specific jobs. the secretary's point is on target. if you try to do this with an overseer of exactly how many left-handed nurses and right- handed carpenters get into the added states, we are doing the wrong thing. we need to do it on demand. if we have an extraordinary need to be competitive, and many, because of the price of energy and the fact the country is probably will have and have access to more energy than anyone else, you will see manufacturing jobs coming back to the united states
. he enacted into law. [applause] >> than a two-year anniversary of lilly ledbetter legislation. forward if women are in the congress and committee. we will have to deal with issues like the safety of our children. thank you for making this a part of your agenda. you will have to be dealing with the issue that relates to violence against women. we need to pass that legislation. we have to deal with jobs. i want to say a personal thanks. if we did not have some many women in the congress we never would have the first woman speaker of the house. you haven't seen that the net. having strength and numbers for women leading the way are helping to change the playing field. i promise you this. it increases the level of civility in politics. we will change the environment in which politics is being conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. thank you, and lee's list. we are emilie, and we ain't seen nothing -- -- thank you, emily's list. seene emilie, and we ain't nothing yet. >> are you emilie? --emily? -- emily? >> hello. i am
pretty much. he went to the best schools in the country, columbia and on to harvard law. he becomes editor of the harvard law review in a blind test. nobody knew -- there's no affirmative action here. blind test. you were the guy that had the best writings, the best research, the best scholarship to get the job. and then he comes back and instead of being a money grubber on wall street, excuse me money grubbers on wall street, he decides he's going to do something for his community where he came from. and then he runs for office, gets beaten by bobby rush and then he gets in a car and drives out to the burbs and lets them decide. >> michelle obama did the same thing. she resented princeton a lot when she got there but she channeled her resentment in a paper about the history of african-american women. the fact they worked within the system given the challenges that they had to have gotten to this place and to be the calming influence that they are i think is remarkable. >> calming, mosh care calm than. >> low bar. low bar. but with an inner fire though. you know -- . >> they proved
under the law. he is talking about doma, the supreme court argument to come. he is surrounded by the supreme court right there. and he talked about stonewall. talking about stonewall in an inaugural address, i was really profoundly moved by that. this is not just saying okay, these people helped elect me. this is saying this is a commitment. we're expanding the vision of dr. martin luther king jr. and we're talking about equal rights for all of us. he is talking about seneca falls. he is talking about women's rights and equal pay. and this was a very forward-looking, progressive, inclusive speech. >> i will say as a gay person that i am used to gay people being name checked in speeches, put in a list of demographic groups that you want to shout out to recognize that we exist, which is always nice. but to have the president articulate why the fight, the continuing struggle, the not at all settled struggle for equal rights is an american project, and to have that delivered from the inaugural lectern was i think -- felt personally was moving to me personally. but i also felt like
to everett dirkson and say the of said, "without ericdirkson, this would be a bill, not a law" he knew how to do that. and he also knew that-- he was willing to make incredible, you know, sort of "what the hell is the presidency for?" when his staff in 1964, before his first state of the union, the entire staff said don't go of the civil rights bill of '64, prohibiting employment discrimination and public accommodation. it's a presidential election year, and he said, what the hell is the presidency for? we'll go for it. and he went for it. and he got it >> condoleezza rice, what did that mean to you? >> it meant everything. i was a little girl in birmingham, alabama. and i remember quite well the day that president kennedy was assassinated, and when we learned he had died my teacher-- we were in school-- my teacher was outside and i heard her say, what, are we going to do now? the president is dead and there's a southerner in the white house?" there was a sense we would not get civil rights legislation. and i have respect and admiration for lyndon johnson. i was telling people independent
stressful moments for the authorities. as a result, we have more than 13,000 military and law enforcement personnel, ready for this event. we have snipers on the roofs. we have biological and chemical units prepared to deal with whatever comes up. we have a high degree of surveillance. satellites zooming in on the mall, as well as hundreds of surveillance cameras, to watch potential suspects. as one official told me last night, we have no specific threat. but we have to be ready for anything, george. >> and i know they've been preparing for this for a year. they've been locking the buildings on the parade route. they've been locking the garbage cans on the parade route. repaved the road. they are taking no chances. we have an incredible team of presidential savvy with us this morning. i want a quick word from two of them sitting with us here. let's start with matthew dowd, contributor to abc news. you have contributed to a combine, as well. both sides of the aisle. what does it take for a president to take a second inauguration and make it soaring? >> well, it's a much different situation
you have fewer people pursuing the same work, the costs go up. >> is this likely to be signed into law by governor chris christie, not exactly a pro union guy? >> we certainly hope that christy will not sign it into law. that we'll be pushing for christie for any project hurricane sandy relief. >> megyn: we'll be watching it. thank you for being here. >> thank you. >> megyn: new poll numbers raising serious questions when it comes to how the country is thinking about the president. what does it mean that 30% of americans believe president obama is hiding something? we'll have a fair and balanced he debate coming up. and shocking new video that may have you thinking twice before you ride the subway again. cameras capturing a brutal attack against a woman just sitting and waiting for her train. now, serious questions how the police handled the hunt for the suspect coming up. [ male announcer ] here's a word that could give you peace of mind. unbiased. some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. some of the ones that push mutual funds with their names on them -- aren't. why? becaus
, connecticut has profoundly moved the dial on public support for stricter gun laws. the new poll finds that 54% of americans think gun control laws should be tightened in comparison to just 39% lass than a year ago. perhaps most heartening is the proposal by gun owners. a whopping 93% of people from gun-owning households support background checks on all gun purchases. and 53% of them support a ban on high-capacity magazines. but will public opinion translate into meaningful policy changes? as we have seen in the weeks since nowtown, not without a fiekt from the nra and the gun lobby. our next guest lee fong, contributing writer for "the nation," and he is here with the latest on what gun manufacturers are doing. welcome back inside "the war room." >> thanks for having me. >> when i see these numbers on guns, it's astonishing how much this tragedy has changed these numbers. >> this tragedy was unique, one because it was so horrific, but two, we saw a lot of political leadership that we haven't seen in previous massacres. with the shooting in wisconsin we didn't see
's three strikes law is a struggle pore inmates getting out early. many inmates who previously received life sentences are being released with $200 and little support. former inmates are not eligible for parole and did not receive services such as training and drug rehabilitation. they approved proposition 36 in november. it allows the inmates whose last crime was minor to be released if they don't pose a risk to public safety. >>> many jobs and programs are being saved thanks to governor brown's tax initiative. they no longer plan to get rid of all librarian positions. art and music teaching jobs are being saved. they need to implement five furlough days and increase the personal income tax on high income earners and increase the sales tax for four years. >>> this is raising questions about who will inspect the construction work on the first section of california's high-speed rail system. the current plan calls for whoever lands the contract, construction will also have to hire the inspectors. and they will report to the rail authority but the engineer's union said will could be a conf
americans. especially to young people. i am emily because i know emily removes barriers fall all laws. -- for all of us. [applause] >> hello. my name is governor maggie hassin. [applause] i serve the granite state along with the and shaheen, carole porter, and annie huster. [applause] it is fair to say that all of us answer to the name emily. even our other united states senator is a woman. that means the hampshire is the first state in our country's history to be represented in congress and in the governor's office entirely by women. [applause] that did not happen by accident. it happened because thousands of women over many, many years worked hand in hand with emily's list and worked hard to get women elected. it happened because emily's liz tells me when i was in the state senate. i even hired a stopper to help manage my campaign. thank you for a superb campaign. it happens because we all turned out the women vote and they voted in overwhelming numbers for democratic candidates across the country. [applause] i have a big job in front of me, but i know i'm not alone. there are a lot
to make it the law of the land and institutionalize it. the presidents hit by the curse. i mean, ronald reagan with the iran-contra scandal. bill clinton had monica lewinski. george bush, katrina. they seem to get unsettled and unraveled by a big event, often beyond their control. barack obama, we don't know what it may be. may be nothing but what he does have, he has at least a green chute to a better economy. he didn't have that four years ago. inherited one of the worst financial messes you could imagine. is that a significant help to him? >> think of second term dwight eisenhower. dealt with the little rock kri sis. nasa. a treaty with 12 countries to demilitarize antarctica. all second term. bill clinton, what he have been without a second term? not a big budget surplus and ronald reagan, i think iran-contra is overblown and historic gorbachev diplomacy and margaret thatcher said reagan ended the cold war without a single shot and the spth feeling good about the second term. he doesn't have the curse mentality. >> what are the priorities, what would you like to see the president fo
will always get guns. doesn't mean you don't make laws. if that is the case you didn't make laws because people would always break them. according to gallup, 53% support president's on gun control. "time" magazine as 56%. there is great support in congress and senate at least among the american people for the president to do what he wants to do. martha: we have another poll we want to look at. it shows basically americans believe the most important thing is to protect the constitutional right of the second amendment to own guns. 51% say that. 40% say they think the most important part is to protect citizens from gun violence. just a quick thought on that, mark. we have to go. we have to break away to something live here. >> exactly. protecting americans from gun violence, the assault weapons ban doesn't do that we had assault weapons ban from 1994 to 2004. it expired in 2004. you know what happened? guns violence went down since the sought weapons ban expired. bill: the white house giving a bit of the theme for the speech. moments away in washington. martha: a major weather alert in part
and uphold our values through strengths of arms and rule of law. we will show courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peaceably not because we are 90 but because engagements can lift suspicion and fear. america " remain at the anger of a strong alliance. we will extend our capacity to manage a crisis and fraud. we will support democracy from asia to africa to the americans to the middle east. our interest and our conscience compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom. we must be a source of hope for the port, sick, marginalized, victims of prejudice. peace requires the advance of those principles. tolerance and opportunity. human dignity. justice. we the people declare the most evidence of sure that all of us are declared equal. just as they guided all those men and women we can not walk alone. our individual freedom is inexplicably bound for the freedom. it is our generation's path to carry on what those pioneers began. our journey is not complete until our mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until ou
pay some poor kenyan for some? so it's been that kind of situation. >> host: you've been to law e, texas, kansas for your research on this and now you are in kenya when does the research part of it in the? >> guest: you just know when you get there. actually the research never ends. there is a point i say i am ready to start writing. i started this book the essentially the day after obama was elected president that's when i decided i'd got to do this book. i'd written a few pieces for "the washington post" before that so i had a basis of research particularly on his mother, and i think when i get home from this incredible journey i will have the kansas side of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins, it's a weaving these incredible worlds that helped create this person. >> host: who came up with the title? >> guest: i did. i was just bouncing around of africa and then i set out of africa come out of dalia, kansas, indonesia, chicago, out of this world. the book is two things it's the world that created obama and then how he recreate himself so i'm not sur
lawyer hours of some of the best law firms in america. part of the frustration that exists regarding immigration -- and i was just at a white house meeting monday and tuesday of this week on this issue -- it relates to the anchor -- the anger people have saying that is broken and we cannot fix it and there's nothing we can do. that is wrong. we have an ability to fix the problem. we should fix the problem. the aba rendered a report that it will continue to act as a resource in fixing the problem. these are things they have online if you are interested. suddenly, you could visit our website feared by the way, if we do not get to your question, i will see you out back. happy to talk to you about anything you want to talk about. >> we should all remember that most of us are at least descendants of immigrants. one thing about justice in a different sense -- i have a question here that says that some constitutions -- and they mention the cuban one -- include health and literacy as basic rights. should we think of those as basic rights? you will certainly realize that at least as to help,
law disproportionately affected african-americans. he saw a racial component there. additionally, he said i don't want to clog the court system with all these cases. what do you want to clog the court system with? we thought given his rhetoric on guns lately it would be interesting to bring up this vote where he said i don't want to give tougher prosecution to children who shoot in schools. >>steve: you look at chicago, one of the murder capitals of the world. nothing the president proposed the other day would crack down on handgun violence in chicago. there is one other thing we want to get to. tell us a little bit about this pro-obama-care group that is inviting journalists in, we know there is a lot of misinformation about obamacare. we're going to tell you how to tell it right. >> this group is sponsoring an event, this commonwealth fund has about an incestuous relationship as anyone. the white house references them on their website, talks about how great they are. this is a group sponsoring an event with mainstream journalists like reuters, going to an event yesterday and today
think he did. >> he's harvard two degrees -- >> so how could he so misstate the law on guns when in fact scalia and the supreme court in 2008 specifically said a woman in anacostia in a crack house next door could have a handgun? and also saying the president exploited this, could somebody tell him he's actually senator of a very large demographically changing state and not the spokesman for the tea party for, like, you know, the greater tea party, the greater houston chapter of the tea party? i was shocked. >> i was shocked too. frankly, because he seemed to be saying in the senatorial way, cruz, my friend and they barely know each other. cruz went after him over and over and over again. it was a very unusual performance by a freshman senator who doesn't seem to want to get along, wants to start a fire here. >> the problem is mika if this had happened in 2010 i'd say i understand the politics of it. the republican party i'm sorry, we have our backs against the wall. the president of the united states has a 52% approval rating. john boehner has an 18% approval
having arrived at the platform, greeting both of his daughters and his wife and mother-in-law. you see behind him, there is vice president biden, chuck schumer, chair of the inaugural committee is the first person we'll hear from and call proceedings to order. and then it unfolds like the greatest graduation ceremony ever. >> rachel, there's a moment when the new president takes over, like when reagan took over from carter, when the chief of secret service walks behind one guy to the other guy, it is pretty creepy. it is pretty creepy when you're the guy losing protection, but nicely enough, it will be the same guy there. >> jerry ford was the first president who upon leaving office from the inauguration of the new president, jimmy carter, decided to leave by helicopter, seen as a rather odd way to leave on the way, but every president has followed that tradition. it is a dramatic way to get out of dodge. also your last ride in marine one. >> you want to allow the indulgence just a bit. >> one of the things as yet undetermined for the second term is who exactly will make up the preside
and uphold our values through strength of arms and the rule of law. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can lift suspicion and fear. america will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe. and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage crisis abroad. for no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world than its most powerful nation. we will support democracy from asia to africa, from the americas to the middle east because our interests and our conscious compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom. we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the magicalized, the victims of prejudice, not out of mere charity, but because peace in our time requires the constant advance of those principles that our common creed describes, tolerance and opportunity, human dignity and justice. we, the people, declared today that the most evident of truths that all of us are created equal. it is the star that g
are wondering what his legacy will be. could it be his new push for tighter gun laws or perhaps something else? we'll talk about that. >>> we've been taking a look -- ronald reagan's second inauguration remain the coldest on record, believe it or not, if you're keeping track. for that reason, they took it indoors. we'll be right back. >> i, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear -- >> i, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear -- >> that i will faithfully execute -- >> that i will faithfully executed -- >> the office of president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability -- >> and will to the best of my ability -- >> preserve, protect, and defend -- >> preserve, protect, and defend -- >> the constitution of the united states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. britta olsen is my patient. i spend long hours with her checking her heart rate, administering her medication, and just
to be successful. >> we're going to make changes to gun laws. i think we'll do some on a national basis and we're clearly already starting it on a state by state basis. so i'm there is going to be a level of success. it's locked in and i think you have to put that into -- i know it's hard for what people in washington to think that something might actually be gotten done but it's going do happen. this newtown changed discussion and whatever is not gotten in the first round, eventually will be gotten because there's going to be more newtowns. we're so far extended on access to weapons of mass destruction that there are going to be other incidention. >> we were looking in the wrong place, right? >> right. >> who would -- you're right. they are here. you know? and when a disturbed individual can take two magazines, 30-round magazines, tape them together so he literally -- all he had to do was turn it around and get another 30 shots off and have multiples of those as you walk into a school, that's who we are right now and america's growing sick of it. and if we start to forget what happened in new
laws in this country. how much a part of the president's resolve will that be in the months coming? >> well, the thing -- the president always said that, you know, you have to do many things at once when you're president, and that's a very important thing. we can't keep replicating these tragedies and it's not just the big tragedies, but the small, smaller strategy dtragedies than the streets every day. so he's determined to move forward on this package of laws. they're not the only things we need to do. some of the things have less to do with government and more to do with what we -- what we do in our home. what our children play and in terms of video games and what they watch. but certainly we need to do something about guns. we are hopeful that we're at a moment when we can pass the impasse that we have seen in the past and really move forward on it. >> hey, david, bob schieffer here. >> hey, bob. >> in normal times, probably we wouldn't report this, but in these fractured times this just in as they say. i'm told that speaker boehner, eric cantor, the number two republican in th
signing the legislation into law where women could get equal pay for equal work. >> that was the first one, first one he signed. >> i remember when i was in college my approvesor was old them and said women were getting 77%. i was thinking my god and to see that. i am happy about that. >> yeah. yeah. absolutely, lowis. i should have mentioned that. the lilly ledbetter act. again, so we are acting at the obstacles he had to overcome, it's amaidsing he got as much done as he did. >> this is "the bill press show." going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. [ music ] >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning. we ho
instead of 2004, in 1989, as he is going off to boston, correct, the harvard law school. >> guest: yes. >> host: so to barack obama is finally going to make and appeared in your book. is this about halfway through the book? >> guest: not halfway. it's 164 pages into it. >> host: we get to hawaii. again, how did his parents meet? >> guest: well, his mother was 17. she was a freshman at the university of hawaii. >> host: i apologize to take it one step back. how did she get to hawaii? >> guest: she got to hawaii because her father, put in a furniture salesman in mercer island, or in seattle, washington, he got a job selling furniture in honolulu. and he was always looking for the next thing. principally moved west. from california to california. to seattle and then from seattle to hawaii. and so she came along with the family. she was only 17 and she graduate from high school, and actual public school in seattle post might only child. >> guest: and she was the only child. her name was stanley in. his name was stanley. i can tell you the story about some other time. in any case, so she is
already signed a trillion dollars of deficit reduction into law and committed to more spending cuts but we can't just cut our way to prosperity. we have toasting to invest in things like -- we have to continue to invest in things like education and energy. he put reducing the deficit in a balanced way to promote jobs for middle class families and that is going to be his guiding principle through the negotiations. >> i want to ask you quickly about the republican idea. would you support it but with the caveat they are telling the senate you haven't passed a budget in more than three years and you need to do that so we have a baseline for negotiations. >> well, let's revisit what the debt limit actually is. this is about congress paying the bills for what it has already racked up. the white house has made clear that the president will take a look at the proposal. they said it is encouraging that the republicans were moving away from some of their demands but the preferenc prefs still a long-term agreement and the president is going to use the negotiations to headache sure that we do reduce t
the law for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity, until bright, young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country. our journey is not complete until all our children from the streets of detroit to the hills of appalachia to the quiet lanes of newtown know that they are cared for and cherished and always safe from harm. that is our generation's task: to make these works, these rights, these values of life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness real for every american >> brown: the broad theme for this inaugural was faith in america's future. the president closed his remarks by looking forward to the expected political battles. he urged both parties to work together for the good of the country but also called for citizens to hold the
are treated like anyone else under the law. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. >> in many ways, this speech was progressives. this is what we have been waiting for to hear for four years. the president is older now, and certainly wiser to the position about how washington works. but at least for today he will not let trivial politics derail the progressive course that this country is on. president obama looked out to the crowd on the national mall today and saw the full scope of america, young and old, rich and poor, black, white, hispanic, asian. he recognized the moment. he captured it. the mission he is charged with today is perhaps greater than his mission of four years ago. in 2009, he was of course there to lead us out of this economic tragedy that we were living in. in 2013, he needs to lead this country and make it the country that we all want to achieve. >> you and i as citizens had the power to set this country's course. you and i as citizens have the obligation to shape t
. the authorities are said to have rarely enforced the laws until the 1930s when a crackdown led to a reform movement which ultimately led to roe v. wade. to this day abortion is still one of the most divisive issues in our nation. a top court issued a landmark ruling 40 years ago today. and now you know the news for this tuesday, january the 22nd, 2013. i'm shepard smith. we're back tomorrow, noon pacific, 3:00 eastern for "studio b." and back here for "the fox report" tomorrow night. thanks for trusting us for your news and information. analysis and opinion begins now. here is mr. bill. the o'reilly factor is on, tonight. >> it's simply impossible to do what the president wants to do. >> his speech was a declaration. the era of big government is back. >> bill: liberals all over the country is overjoyed that obama is going to continue the spending on social justice. why does the left not see the economic danger though. charles krauthammer and george stephanopoulos will weigh in. >> good people stayed in their houses and didn't speak up when there was carnage in the streets and total violati
that would last. immediately his mother-in-law was in the residence with them. it seems to be working quite well. pete souza, white house photographer in the background. >>> let's get to andrea mitchell on hill right now. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning again to you. this is a panorama. these are the greatest seats where governors and senators will be seated. they will be escorted in a little bit. we'll be talking to some of them from their vantage point and you'll see democrats and republicans. if you pan out a little bit, you'll see well-known republican strategist standing next to me. four years ago, frank, you helped lead a group of republicans who were strategizing, including cantor, all the house leaders, strategizing on how to stop barack obama from achieving his goals. was that a signal of the obstructionism and partisanship that we experienced? >> this is really surreal that i would be standing next to you. i hope we don't lose the contract because of it. republicans did gather four years ago but it was kind of irrelevant. they lost the house, the senate, the white h
so many laws and regulations and taxes that they kill the start up businesses in ways that are crazy. >> i have to jump in. thank you so much for talking about entrepreneurship. you were there, you were a part of that. there has been so much destruction to the assistance program. talk about rules and regulations. those are things your administration, when you were the speaker of the house, so many of those types of rules and regulations were built into the program, so much that they have not responded to the recession. it is only able to reach about 30% of the children who are poor in this country. an incredible increase in child poverty been. micro finance would may be a great way to insert into the system. if a woman is receiving cash assistance or food stamps and she happens to, may be working on the side doing hair and nails, housekeeping, child care. fair -- fantastic things. that $50 or $100 she makes on the weekend, god forbid she reported to the case manager because she would be criminalized for something that would be celebrated in this country. [applause] >> i agree with yo
to help in the push for stiffer gun control laws. >> although there's no single solution that can bring a decisive end to this senseless violence, it's incumbent upon each of us to try. and it's time to consider what steps we can take together to save lives. >> joining me now here in the studio, scott smith, mayor of mesa, arizona, who will be the next president of the mayors conference. mayor smith, thank you for joining me. >> thanks for having me. >> let's talk about guns. you are from a so-called red state there in arizona. >> so-called? >> you know. >> it is red. >> let's take a look at the graphics here that shows how things go, in terms of essentially red state -- blue state divide across this country with our gun laws. arizona among the places that wants to loosen laws. so you know what's coming here, in the light of newtown, do you think that your state is wrong on that front? >> that's the problem with this. who's right and who's wrong. we're talking about a basic constitutional right. there's a lot of differences of opinion as to at what point do you start to infringe upon th
and serve us. as an attorney and a dean of one of the top law schools in the midwest, i run an institution that promote access to justice and six to train the next generation of leaders and public servants. early support from emily's list help me raise my voice and share my story. the staffer came to michigan looked me in the eye and said he knew i had what it took to win. thanks to her support i was able to earn more votes than any other democratic candidates in the state of michigan. electing pro-choice democratic women meet early support an early investment in young female candidates. a meat nurturing us, our careers, and strengthening our aby
a law they say is unconstitutional because >> we think these elections need to reflect the will of the people. we think the upcoming election is an absurd and futile. the government -- >> the government is not interested in reform. >> all the dead, constitution reform, nothing, they are trying to deceive the people. >> the muslim brotherhood says it will do nothing more than carry on with protests, demanding political reform. sources inside told of the conflict in syria prohibiting protesters who fear the country could ascend into unrest. >> elections cannot be held until a consensus is reached. that is why the muslim brotherhood calls for propose -- calls for postponing the election. >> the government believes the upcoming election will be a success. >> it is the people's right to go to the polls or not. >> protest movement has been slow appeared as much as people are angry at the governments they are not willing to take a risk that could push the country into an uncertain direction. >> coming up, global recognition for a south african painter turn the light into art.
on his legislative proposals. he should recommend a creative revision of the tax laws, the serious debt and debt reduction program. he should have congress enacted budget which has not occurred for the past three years. he might come up with a proposal for inventing public-private partnerships to improve infrastructure, including the electric grid. and, of course, continue to encourage energy independence. the resolution of the supply of unfilled housing should be tried but only if a reelected barack obama can somehow find a unique instrument required to work with this administration to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with the congresswoman to pass legislation that this country so desperately needs. although it's not a -- one can ask will he be reelected. historically rarely have presidents been real elected to a second term with popular ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests, but so does romney. interesting to note that only three of the 19 presidents elected to a second term as relatively less popularity ratings at the time of their re
with congress on his legislative proposal. he should recommend a creative revision of the tax law, serious debt reduction program. should encourage college to enact an annual budget that occurred for the past three years. he might come up with a proposal for inventive public or of a partnership to improve infrastructure, including the electric grid and of course continue to encourage any energy independence. the resolution of unsold houses should be sought, but all of this will occur only if a reelected barack obama could somehow find the unique temperament required to work with his administration, to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with a congress willing to pass legislation the country so desperately needs. what is not a subject of this paper, one can ask and will he be reelected? rarely have presidents been reelected to a second term as popularity ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests. so does romney. it's interesting to note only three of 19 presidents elected to a second term had relatively less popularity rating at the time of the reelect
ahead and enforce the laws on the books, they've been pushing for that all along and they like that and plus, it was a couple of weeks ago, where wayne lapierre was excoriated on the airwaves for saying how dare him coming out and saying we should have more police officers or armed personnel in the schools. and now the president of the united states, in his initiatives have suggested that as well to put some more school resource people in the schools. so, that goes along with the nra as well. >> brian: right now we're waiting for the swearing-in ceremony nor vice-president joe biden to get underway, they're running a little late and we'll bring it to you live when it happens, even if you're in the middle of at pocket chair ad. does this look like a threat? a five-year-old suspended fr kindergarten because of this? we report you decide. >> looks like a hair dryer. [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? maybe you want to incorporate a business. orrotect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan atto
go to commercial break, let's take a look. there you see the -- the president's mother-in-law. gloria, they will be making their way here to -- to the capitol. as the -- president's aides get ready to get in the various cars. what part of the white house is this? >> i think we are looking right now at the north door. the president has been attending a coffee with congressional leaders, with senate leader mitch mcconnell. speaker boehner and congressman eric cantor. i confirmed that. with each of their offices. a nice bipartisan tradition and good way to kick off a new term. those of you discussing he does not do enough socializing with leaders, here he is doing just that. he's been with -- the wives, vice president biden and his wife has been there as has the first lady. they will then head in the motorcade and make their way up here to the capitol where they will go into a hold for about an hour before the president speaks. >> senator john kerry arriving at the capitol. there's senator kerry. >> confirmation hearings. secretary of state. >> this is the entrance you see usually in the
of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them .p for the expedientce's sake and so to all other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the ground this -- ground this -- grandest countries to the smallest village where my father was born, and know that america is a friend of each nation and every man, woman, and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, that we are ready to lead once more. [cheers and applause] we call that earlier generations faced down fascism and communities on -- and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. they understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as he pleased. instead they knew that our power grows through its root in use, our security emanates from the justness of our cause the force of our example how much tempered qualities of humility and restraint. we are the keepers of this legacy. guided by these principles once more, we can meet these new threats t
his family moved, he encountered racism head on. he went to law school and became an advocate for tenants rights in boston where he began to scratch poems on legal pads while waiting in court houses for cases to be called. you can't read any of his 16 books of poems and essay, and most recently, the trouble ball, without understanding a man who is a struggling writer, whose past is a living, breathing news whispering over his shoulder as he scribbles the names of ancestors who once pulled the oars over troubled waters. it was in the wake of president barack obama's victory that brought him here, to the former slave frederick douglas skpchlt with it, a poem. >> rochester, new york, november 7, 2008. this is the long titude and latitude of the impossible. this is the epicenter of the unthinkable. this is the crossroads of the unimaginable, the tomb of frederick douglas three days after the election. this is a world spinning away from the gravity of centuries where the grave of a fugitive slave has become an altar. this is a tomb of a man born as chattel who taught himself to rea
but he's got to make it the law of the land. >> most presidents had been hit by this curse. ronald reagan has the iran contra scandal. they all seem to get unsettled and unravelled by a big event often beyond their control. barack obama, we don't know what it may be. it may be nothing. he has the green shoot for a better economy. hi didn he didn't have that four years ago. is that going to be a significant help to him? >> think about second term dwight eisenhower. he created nasa. he signed a treaty with 12 countries to demilitaryize an antartica. ronald reagan, i think iran contra gets overblown. the president is feeling good about a second term. he doesn't have the luxury of a curse mentality. >> what are your priorities. what would you like to see the president focus on? they say in the second term you get a maximum of about 18 months to shove through the agenda that you want to do. what should he look to do? >> there's all the stuff that's been on the table that's been talked about in the media, immigration reform, gun control and a couple of other issues. i'd like to see him work on
of one of the top law schools in the midwest, i run an institution that promote access to justice and six to train the next generation of leaders and public servants. early support from emily's list helped me raise my voice and share my story. the staffer came to michigan looked me in the eye and said he knew i had what it took to win. thanks to her support i was able to earn more votes than any other democratic candidates in the state of michigan. electing pro-choice democratic women meet early support an early investment in young female candidates. it means nurturing us, our careers, and strengthening our ability to lead. it also means recognizing that our vote is our boys. -- voice./ women voters everywhere are informed and engage in ready to participate. emily's list perseveres and stands for all of us. thank you. >> i am senator tammy baldwin. [applause] thank you. thank you. thank you to all the incredible people in this room who have done so much for me and so much to help elect pro-choice women across this country. i am so proud to be one of nine emily's list women reelected in 20
brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> today's inaugural poem came from richard blanco, a cuban american who says negotiating his identity as an american and as a gay man is the wellspring of poetry. he said he has lived the american dream as being named the fifth inaugural poet. here's part of the poem he read today to the president and to the world. >> we head home through the gloss of rain or weight of snow or the plum blush of dusk but always, always home, always under one sky, our sky. and always one moon like a silent drum tapping on every roof top and every window of one country. >> richard blanco joins me now. what a day this must have been for you. the first latino american to read a poem at thisinaugural, the first gay american to do that. what was it like? >> the actual event was just amazing. what i've come away with, of course, i've never done this before. it seemed very intimate and the atmosphere at that moment was in some ways, everything i was try
in a long island suburb, he encountered racism head-on. he went to law school and became an advocate for tenants' rights in boston where he began to scratch poems on yellow legal pads while waiting in courthouses for cases to be called. you can't read any of his 16 books of poems, translations and essays,including, most recently, "the trouble ball," without discoverina man wh undetands life as struggle. a writer for whom the past is a living, breathing muse whispering over his shoulder, as he scribbles the names of ancestors who once pulled the oars to get us through troubled waters. so it was, four years ago, in the wake of obama's victory, that the muse guided mart├Źn espada here to the graveside of the great 19th-century abolitionist, the former slave, frederick douglass. and from that moment came this poem. >> litany at the tomb of frederick douglass, mount hope cemetery, rochester, new york november 7, 2008. this is the longitude and latitude of the impossible. this is the epicenter of the unthinkable. this is the crossroads of the unimaginable. the tomb of frederick douglass, t
. the progressive era new deal and great society laws were enacted when america was still a young and growing nation. they were enacted in a nation that was vibrant, raw, underinstitutionalized and needing taming. reinvigorating a mature nation means giving government to give people the tools to compete but then opening up a wide field so they do so ruak cowsly creatively. it means spending more here but de regulating more there. it means facing the fact we do have to choose between current benefits to seniors and investments in our future, and that to pretend we don't face that choice as obama did is effectively to sacrifice the future to the past. >> jonathan, first, what do you think of this speech and secondly, what do you think of david's column? >> i thought the president's speech was terrific, a progressive vision for the country. the guy won twice and ran on all the things he talked about yesterday, inclusion, balanced approach to the nation's problems. when it comes to david brooks' column, as mika was reading, i was thinking, how is that different from what the president actually said? i m
out in violation of pennsylvania law. this is where i think maybe things will get better. family not notified. they told the family less than two weeks ago. >> bill: the loophole you found. a loophole that could keep this guy. when he is set to be released. >> january 28th. >> bill: this coming monday? this is outrageous. >> take the time to make sure it doesn't happen. they are entitled to 90 days notice and attend the parole hearing. they were deprived of both. >> bill: bill i want to call the attorney general in pennsylvania and report back next tuesday. this guy gets out. that can't happen. come on. >> >> there is hope apparently the brother of the victim is going to be allowed to go in front of the board. got to be before the 28th or it doesn't matter. >> bill: thanks very much. when we come right back, collin powell echoing president obama's policies. also the general talked with jesse watters in washington yesterday. could see how thrilled he was. show you what happened in that meeting. momentntntntnt >> thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly in the impact segment t
it the law of the land. these are the people whose main goal in unseating president obama was to go after the health care act. now, they've even weakened on that. >> right. and one of the key divisions within the republican party is, on the one side, you have people who recognize that the 2010 kind of tea party uprising was a momentary phenomenon. the backlash against it has effectively wiped it out. it will be around because it can be self sustaining because there's enough republican districts that you can have several dozen of these members in the house for the foreseeable future. and the other candidate that looked at the 2012 election and said we're on the wrong side of the demographic and political shifts that are happening here. what can we do to change the course of this. but the problem is that there are a ton of republicans who are just fine with controlling the house, controlling a lot of governor's mansions, controlling the kind of consultantcy corporations. a lot of people are doing very well by this status quo. >> especially when the extremists have become unpopular. you know
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